Inbound vs Outbound #20 – April 2022

The point of this article is to see what I’ve purchased versus what I’ve decluttered in the month. The ultimate goal is to see, if over time, I’m bringing more into my life than taking out. Also, if the things I do bring in are adding more value into my life in the long run since I’m documenting when it’s arriving.

plane landing
Photo by Shoval Zonnis on Pexels.com

Inbound: 

  • One litter box
  • One litter scoop
  • One cat carrier
  • Five cat toys
  • Two bowls
  • One cat tree
  • Two cat scratcher
  • One litter genie thing
  • One cat
  • Five candles (different from the candles I got in February)
  • One long sleeve shirt
  • One zipper sweater
  • Two pots I found at the side of the road
  • One snake plant I found at the side of the road
Side of the road snake plant in random side of the road pot
plane taking off
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Outbound:

  • Two phone cases (given away on the buy nothing group)
  • One hair claw clip (garbage since I broke it)
  • One Alocasia Black Velvet (sold on FB marketplace)
  • One beer glass (garbage since it broke)
  • One bag of clothing including at least one dress, two blazers, and four t-shirts (local clothing swap)
  • One candle (gifted to a friend)

So the big thing from this month is that we got a cat. That involved getting a bunch of stuff. We started with the basics, but got a few more toys and things as we figure out what the cat liked and needed.

Hopefully he will require less random stuff in future months. Despite all the toys we’ve gotten him, his favorite thing in the world so far has been a crumpled up Tim Horton’s donut wrapper/paper bag. He’s pulled it out of the recycling bin multiple times to play with it.

Another highlight of the month, is that I finally got rid of a bag of clothes that’s been sitting at the bottom of my closet since January. I didn’t want to just drop it off a Value Village where it would likely get trashed. I found a local clothing swap, which was perfect. I did leave with two pieces, but still a net negative to my closet.

Overall a busy month, I can believe that it’s already over.

Inbound vs Outbound #19 – March 2022

The point of this article is to see what I’ve purchased versus what I’ve decluttered in the month. The ultimate goal is to see, if over time, I’m bringing more into my life than taking out. Also, if the things I do bring in are adding more value into my life in the long run since I’m documenting when it’s arriving.

plane landing
Photo by Shoval Zonnis on Pexels.com

Inbound: 

  • Four semi precious jewel I impulsively bought on an online auction;
  • Sticky traps for fungus gnats;
  • Cheese making mold;
  • One ball of yarn;
  • One laptop;
  • One “Mercury in Retrograde” kit (gifted);
  • A pair of skinny jeans;
  • Six bottles of nail polish;
  • Two plant pots;
  • One Callisia Repens;
  • One Butterwort carnivorous plant; and
  • One vintage jacket.

plane taking off
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Outbound:

  • A super large pile of random papers and notes;
  • Two learn to play guitar books (Buy Nothing Group);
  • An pile of black plastic take out containers (Case Toronto);
  • One dead Callisia Repens; and

The last week of March I was off between jobs. So I did a big reorganize of some of our storage closets. It was probably a good sign that the only thing that really didn’t spark joy was a bunch of old tax documents and papers from university.

I was also able to empty out and consolidate some boxes. Which I think is a good thing. Downside: I brought in more stuff than decluttered this month. During my declutter, discovered a bin of yarn that I had sorta forgotten about. So the contents of that box will be my next big priority to tackle.

Inbound vs Outbound #17 – February 2022

The point of this article is to see what I’ve purchased versus what I’ve decluttered in the month. The ultimate goal is to see, if over time, I’m bringing more into my life than taking out. Also, if the things I do bring in are adding more value into my life in the long run since I’m documenting when it’s arriving.

plane landing
Photo by Shoval Zonnis on Pexels.com

Inbound: 

  • Seven candles (I know that’s a lot);
  • One shampoo and conditioner tester set;
  • Six woven placemats;
  • One t-shirt; and
  • One kitchen knife

plane taking off
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Outbound:

  • Nothing

A short list for a short month. Most of the items are belated Christmas gifts. I’m planning on gifting some of the candles, but they also smell really nice so I might keep them. We will see how that pans out.

I have a bag of clothes I’m planning on decluttering. But it doesn’t count until it’s out of the apartment, so that is my goal for March.

Inbound vs Outbound #16 – January 2022

The point of this article is to see what I’ve purchased versus what I’ve decluttered in the month. The ultimate goal is to see, if over time, I’m bringing more into my life than taking out. Also, if the things I do bring in are adding more value into my life in the long run since I’m documenting when it’s arriving.

plane landing
Photo by Shoval Zonnis on Pexels.com

Inbound: 

  • One fleece sweater
  • One blender

plane taking off
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Outbound:

  • One plastic bag worth of clothes. With at least four blouses, and three shirts for textile recycling.

A quiet month in comparison to the last couple of months in terms of items in the house. A really quiet month in general. Toronto was back in lockdown, and we had a few snow storms, so I wasn’t rushing to go outside. Also I’m still trying to stick to my new years goals of not spending as much money, so I’ve been staying off online shops.

If you haven’t checked it out already, my last post (Backsliding and Some Thoughts about my History with Stuff) is kinda reflecting of my spending habits and my relationship with stuff, as the title suggests. I got some good feedback from people on it, so it might be up your alley if you got to this point in the post.

BOOK REVIEW: Fashionopolis by Dana Thomas

men s gray and black button up shirt on mannequin

I heard about Fashionopolis as it was one of sources on a recent Climate Town video (which was awesome and you should totally watch after you’re done here).  

Fashionopolis is the third book by Dana Thomas, published in 2019. She’s a careered fashion journalist for such esteemed publications as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Harper’s Bazaar and more.

The book is set up in three parts.  

Part One covers the history of mass produced garments. Starting in the industrial revolution to now in the world of over consumption, globalism and exploitation. Fun…

It did start exploring more modern manufacturing plants that are more automated and transparent about how the workers are being treated. Which is nice to know there’s some change in the industry to make things a tad bit safer. But at the same time the big fast fashion companies are still actively lobbying against countries like Bangladesh from raising the minimum wage.   

This part was interesting but also extremely sad, since it really highlights the lack of care companies have for their employees lives or safety.  

Image Source and an interesting article about garment workers during the Pandemic.

Part Two was more focused on material production and ‘rightshoring’ which is the return of garment manufacturing in first world countries with more more ethical and environmentally conscious practices. Or that is how I understood it in the context of the book. I googled it after finishing the book and my definition is off.

It gives reasons to why some garment manufacturing is coming back to the US and UK. As well as suppliers like dyes, wools, lower water cotton and more.

There were interviews some of the startups that are working on fabric recycling, particularly cotton/poly blends (which is shockingly common and currently essentially impossible to reuse or recycle (Secondhand covered the journey to the grave is covered really well in that book if you’re curious)).  

Somewhere in this section we start hearing about Stella McCartney, the fashion designer. I knew her as the lady that designed that ugly jackets for Taylor Swift’s Lover merch. She’s also Paul McCartney’s daughter. #funfacts 

But she’s been very active in reducing furs in luxury fashion, and has been investing and partnering with many of small manufacturers that are creating ethical or recycled materials. It was really cool. But also the book talked about her a lot. I don’t know if it’s because she’s the only one doing anything or if that just who the author could interview.  

Part Three is about renting and sharing of clothing, as well as the second hand market. All of which have been growing in recent years. The author seemed to focus in on luxury rental companies (Like the Real Real). I think it would have been cool to have talked more which places like ThreadUp or Goodwill to discuss how the secondhand bomb has been effecting them. Since that’s where us normies get our second hand clothes.

black framed eyeglasses on white jacket and blue denim bottoms
Photo by Ylanite Koppens on Pexels.com

I enjoyed Fashionopolis. I have an interest in fashion (or maybe garment production since I like sewing). And this book was filled with sooo much interesting information. However, when I read a book like this, I wish it was a documentary instead. The author tried describing this as much as she could but I want to see it. I ended up having to google some of the stuff mentioned just to understand what she’s talking about. So at the very least photos would have improved the reading experience. If you have a interest in fashion or curious about garment manufacturing this book is for you.

How am I supposed to imagine this from a description? Image Source (PS it’s a 3-D printed dress)

If you curious about over fashion related book review, my review for Project 333 is for you. Or check out all my book reviews here.