Book Review: A Good War by Seth Klein

Back in January 2021, I was walking down a sidewalk getting my lunch while I was on site for my job. I passed a cute book shop (Great Escape Bookstore check it out if you’re in Toronto), and they had a sign and A Good War on display. I saw the big ass windmill, Canada, climate and I was in. I immediately DM’ed the shop to buy a copy since they were closed due to Covid restrictions for Wave 2.

Going in, I was expecting the book to be all about green energy in Canada. I will tell you right now, it is not. I would have known if I read the back before buying the book. But let me tell ya, I was confused in the introduction when Klein was talking about the World Wars. Anyways…

The book’s main thesis is that we are in a Climate Emergency and as a nation we should be treating it as such and get our shit together similar to what they did in World War II.

Klein focuses on the different players, individual people, communities, corporations, and (for the largest part) the Government.

Photo by Lachlan Ross on Pexels.com

It took me forever to read this book. Since there’s a lot of information in it, I had to take a lot of breaks. Between reading this and seeing climate and Covid stuff on all my social media, I was just getting a tad overwhelmed and melancholic. Thus this review is being posted four months – and one pandemic wave – later.

In general, I enjoyed the book. Most of the books I’ve read on the climate are about the USA, so it was refreshing and more relevant to read about the place I live. Klein was also really conscious to include Indigenous voices and their Governance throughout. Again, this isn’t something you see if you aren’t reading a book about Canada. 

I have no interest in history, so pretty much all the information about World War II was new to me.

At a high level, I do agree that we are in an emergency/war against carbon emissions and we all should be acting as such. I don’t fully agree with the details of some of Klein’s methods, but I see how he got there.

One thing I wish was a bit more explicit in the conclusion was what the reader should be doing after reading this book. I finished it up and was like, now what? Now I have all this information and nothing to do with it. The clerk at the bookstore, who sold me my copy, told me about how much she enjoyed it and how she was sending letters to our MPs to convince them to take action. I guess this is the main thing we need to do. A lot of the big changes needed won’t be done unless forced to. Examples: purchasing electric vehicles, not fracking, reducing energy consumption in buildings.

I work in existing buildings, so I do want to talk to my boss and see what we can do to be pushing our clients towards more resilient, less oil/natural gas dependent equipment replacements. That might be a hard sell, since gas is currently cheaper than electricity (in Ontario, it is different in other provinces). I’ll update if there’s anything worth reporting on that front.

Photo by Lukas Rodriguez on Pexels.com

I would recommend this book. I found Klein’s suggestions and vision for a sustainable future way more realistic and rooted than Voluntary Simplicity (Link to review), which was basically living in a commune.

Below is a list of the ideas  that I found the most interesting, in case you aren’t going to read the book or want a little preview:

  • Use terms such as ’Climate Crisis’ or ’Climate Emergency’ instead of ‘climate change’ or ’global warming’ like The Guardian started to do in 2019. It puts into focus that this is a pressing issue that should be addressed instead of sounding like a passive item.
  • The government could make Green Bonds, similar to Victory Bonds, which would help raise capital for massive green infrastructure projects, but provide slow yet predictable yields for the investors.
  • The level of infrastructure change is going to be massive. Do you know how much of your day-to-day life relies on oil and natural gas? A metric fuck tonne: your car, your house/apartment, your take-out containers. This will be a complicated process that will require not only more (and new) jobs but lots of money. It will be worth spending because most people enjoy being alive. Also, not screwing over future generations would be cool.
  • Creating new Crown Corporations like they did in the war to keep companies competitive in tenders. (Ex. If there are 1-3 companies that can do a thing, they will bid high cause they know they can get away with it, since exclusivity. A crown corp would bid fair because why would the government want to screw the government, and keep other companies staying competitive). Or to do the stuff that was just too cost-prohibitive for other companies to take on. I really enjoyed this part of the book, maybe because the tendering process is part of my job, but also because I didn’t know that was something that was done during WWII. Again don’t know if I agree with the idea but still interested in the suggestion.
  • A Crown Corporation to buy the old GM plant in Oshawa, and turn it into a factory making electric Canada Post vehicles. See Green Jobs Oshawa for more information on the group working to lobby for that.
  • Oil companies = evil. That’s not how it was described in the book, but that’s the short and dirty version. Oil companies are destroying our environment and not paying enough taxes to do it. Klein suggested either upping their tax rate (similar to what other countries have done) or expropriating it and turning it into a Crown Corporation. I personally think taxing makes more sense, but that may cause the companies to bail on Alberta. Which means we (more like the government or something) should be working on transitioning those workers into a job that isn’t oil based.
  • AKA: the Green New Deal, like the resolution AOC proposed in the State but here and tailored to our landscape.
  • In order to prevent CO2 emissions rising to dangerous levels, everyone needs to be involved. Not as a suggestion, but as a requirement. Every Canadian did something to help in the war effort in WWII, either as direct support to the war efforts, or due to rationing, recycling, and general cutbacks to one’s lifestyles. That needs to happen, particularly to the 1%. We are the 1% of the world, so we should be doing more, but the 1% of our country should be doing the most, since we are in this mess because of ~Capitalism~.
  • The previous point – and most of the suggestions in the book – will require government (mostly Federal) intervention. I don’t love that this is what we need to rely on, because it would be nice to think that people/corporations can do the correct thing if simply asked to. But this past year (2020) has proven that you can’t expect anyone, even your government, to do anything.

We are totally fucked…

Photo by kien virak on Pexels.com

I really admire Klein’s optimism throughout the book. It’s not in your face, but he does seem to believe the best in people. He believes the government, with enough public support, will do what is needed to prevent the climate, and life as we know it, from collapsing. The book did include an epilogue about the Government’s response to Covid-19, and you can tell it was written early in the pandemic. It mentioned strong mask compliance, CERB, and a glimmer of hope for a vaccine. I’m writing this in Wave Three, with both a vaccine shortage, a bunch of empty vaccine appointments for 70+, and no paid sick days. It feels like every level of Government has abandoned us.

Klein did mention in the book that he would keep an updated epilogue on his website. I looked for it but  couldn’t find it. I’m not sure if it was because of the website formatting on my tablet or not. But I would be interested in reading it.

As mentioned before, the main actionable item from the book is letting the Government know that reducing emissions and addressing the Climate Crisis should be a top priority item. Below I’ve put a letter you can send to your government representative to show we care. This letter was heavily adapted (ie mostly copied) from the one found here, on the David Suzuki Foundation page. I also liked this one from Greenpeace.

Dear [Prime Minister Trudeau, or your Member of Parliament],

As Parliament prepares for Budget 2021 and beyond, let’s ensure that the pandemic recovery is green and just, benefitting people and the planet. Every day when I see the news, I see either Covid-19, the climate crisis, or the housing crisis. This budget is the best opportunity to make the environment, sustainability, and resilience keys part of the Countries recovery plan.

I urge you to invest in measures that support communities and create jobs while setting Canada on track to: 

-Reduce carbon pollution to limit warming to 1.5 C and enable Canada to do its fair share to contribute to a livable climate. A few suggestions are:

  • increasing taxation on oil, fossil fuels and eventually slowing/stopping oil and natural gas production;
  • reducing subitizes for animal agriculture and reinvesting it in plant agriculture;
  • More grants/tax cuts for retrofitting homes and offices to assist in transition off oil/natural gas heating. Generally increasing the number of grants and/or tax rebates for energy, and water efficiencies retrofits. 

-Address the biodiversity crisis by protecting, restoring and investing in nature as the foundation of our health, economy and well-being, and reforming industries that interact with it. I’m not sure if this is within the scope of the Federal Government power, but a good start would be to prevent the Ontario Provincial Government from developing protected wetlands in Pickering.

-An end to the use of single-use plastics. Growth of a circular economy, and improve our domestic recycling programs. We reply too often on sending our ‘recycling’ to other countries, instead of dealing with our own messes. 

Budget 2021 must also invest in upgrading the core environmental functions of government necessary to support a green recovery, like chemicals management, pesticide regulation and environmental law enforcement.

Canada’s COVID-19 response and recovery plan must also uphold these principles for a just recovery: 

-Put people’s health and well-being first. No exceptions. 

-Strengthen the social safety net and provide relief directly to people. This past year has shown that providing directly to the people is much more effective than to companies.

-Build solidarity and equity across communities, generations and borders. 

-Uphold Indigenous rights and work in partnership with Indigenous Peoples. 

We don’t have to choose between managing the pandemic and creating a sustainable future. If we don’t get significantly more proactive about reducing Carbon emissions and reducing our collective environmental impact, viruses such as the one we just lived through may be the norm. Which you may not be alive to see happen but I will. So will the generation of kids who already don’t know what the bottom half of a stranger’s face looks like since they don’t have any memories from before this Pandemic.  

All this to say, that pandemic recovery, and Canada’s sustainable future are inseparable issues, and the upcoming budget is the time to take steps for both issues.

Will you commit to supporting budget measures that enable Canada to build a clean-energy economy swiftly and justly?

Sincerely,

[your name will go here]

[your email address will go here], [your location will go here]

That’s pretty much the post. A bit of a departure from what I was planning on reading and reviewing on this blog. But I found the topic really interesting. April is Earth Month so this, and the book I’m currently reading might create a Climate Crisis theme for the blog.

Did any of the ideas that Klein mentioned resonate with you? I would love to hear it in the comments below. 

BOOK REVIEW : The Year of Less by Cait Flanders

I recently finished listening to The year of Less by Cait Flanders. Published in 2018, the book chronicles Cait’s journey through her year of being in a shopping ban. My friend Sam recommended it and I kept seeing it in Libby as related titles to other books I was reading.

The short review is: I enjoyed the book. I listened to the audiobook, which was narrated by the author which I though was nice, as it is her memoir.

I also liked that Cait is Canadian. As a Torontonian, it’s nice to read from authors that are in my neck of the woods (sometimes, most of the book took place in BC).

Photo by James Wheeler on Pexels.com

The book starts with a prologue of Cait telling her friends that she’s going to do a shopping ban. Meaning she’s only going to buy food, gas, and an approved list of items. After that, each chapter is a reflection of one month of her journey.

As part of the ban, she also decided that she would  get rid of any extra items in her life. In July, her first month of the ban, she decluttered like 40 or 50% of her belonging. Which is pretty impressive.

The book is mostly reflection on her process, if you are looking for a practical guide or a step by step guide, this book isn’t it!

I noticed that the majority of the one star reviews come from people that expected it to be a guide, not a memoir. But if you read the full tile or the synopsis, this shouldn’t be an issue for you. But if you want a guide, see the last six pages of the book (#spoilers).

Although, its not a guide there were some take always. I though that her November chapter and facing Black Friday was the best, and most useful part of the book.

Photo by Daniela Constantini on Pexels.com

Maybe because I was listening to large chucks of it at a time, I did find that some of her wording or things she was saying rather repetitive. For example, when she was talking about the stuff she quit before this year it would always the same words, in the same order.

This next part will seems cold, since her addictions are obviously important and transformative but I heard about it too often… I didn’t hear much about her trying to learn to sew or more logistics on how she was trying to go zero waste. Which would have been nice since those are both large projects.

Again it’s not a instruction manual, but I found she focused a lot on things that happened years ago than things that were happening during the year of her spending ban. It seems like she mastered sewing and going low waste without any sort of second thought, which I find unlikely. But I heard so much about her previous drinking habits in ways that didn’t make sense in the greater context of what was going on.

She mentioned in the epilogue she didn’t take up candle making but it would have been nice to have more of an exploration on her buying the supplies and why she ended up not using them. What was she doing instead? Not sure, it wasn’t developed.

Photo by Vishrut Bajpai on Pexels.com

So overall a nice quick read/listen. I didn’t hate it, but it’s been a few days since I finished it and I don’t really remember much about it. I mentioned that to my friend that recommended it to me and we both agree on that point.

I do remember being very frustrated by her always buying books and never using her Library. She would donate her books to the library but didn’t actually use the resources. I found that part extremely frustrating!

On the podcast I listen to “Go Help Yourself” they always ask if this book needed to be written and who is it perfect and not perfect for. Which I think is a useful format to wrap up this book.

Did this book need to be written?

No. In my opinion, there was very few memoirs that need to be written. Without wanting to sound mean, this book didn’t present anything particularly new or revolutionary.

Who is this book perfect for?

I think its perfect for people that need to hear other peoples success stories as a way to motivate themselves. Very similar to people that watch cleaning videos to get themselves to clean. Or people that are just entering the minimalism/slow movement and want to see how others have done it.

Who is this not perfect for?

Based on the 1 star reviews on Goodreads, this book is terrible if you are looking for actionable advice and a step by step guide on how to live with less.

So that’s my review of A Year of Less by Cait Flanders. Have you read it or seen it in the bookstores/ library shelves? Let me know in the comments.